Friday, August 1, 2014

Hollywood Regency: Then and Now

By Gretchen Sawatzki

The Hollywood Regency style is little known, but widely loved among American decorators and trendsetters. It's story and growth in popularity is deep rooted in glitz and glamour and is experiencing a present day revival!

William Haines, 1928. Image source
As glamorous as it's namesake, The Hollywood Regency style uses a mix of modern lines, with Neoclassical ornamentation, hard materials with soft accents, that epitomized the amped up luxury of 1930s Hollywood - as it should! Hollywood actor, William Haines is credited as the originator of the style, drawing inspiration from the bright colors and theatrical accents used on film sets. His goal was to blend casual with formal in a way that allowed for fluid conversation and comfort.  An actor during the golden age of Hollywood (1920s and 1930s), Haines hobnobbed with the leading ladies of the day including Carole Lombard and Joan Crawford - women that embodied his bold yet sophisticated style.

While working in film, Haines met his future life partner, James "Jimmie" Shields and the two shared a career dealing in antiques and designing interiors until his death in 1973. Throughout his career, Haines designed spaces for Hollywood's elite and even Ronald and Nancy Reagan. Although the style reached its peak in the 1970s, it is currently experiencing a revival.

The Hollywood Regency style today. Image source
Today, the style utilizes bold colors, shiny materials, and high lacquered surfaces. With designers like Jonathan Adler reinventing the luxe style to fit modern needs, the Hollywood Regency style is often injected into our favorite restaurants and boutique hotels. The perfect blend of glamour, modernism, and Neoclassical, the style is "user-friendly" allowing for fine antiques and modern furnishings to live together in harmony.

Sources:
             Decor To Adore
             International Movie Database
             JonathanAdler.com
             WilliamHaines.com
           

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